Month: February 2011

New words and altered meanings

buy modafinil online in uk Sue sent through a list of new words and altered meanings from a competition run by The Washington Post. These were my favourites: Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house, which renders the subject financially impotent for an indefinite period of time. Ignoranus : A person who’s both stupid and an asshole. Intaxicaton : Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize it was your money to start with. Giraffiti : Vandalism spray-painted very, very high Sarchasm : The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn’t get it. Inoculatte : To take coffee intravenously when you are running late. Decafalon (n.): The gruelling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you. Glibido : All talk and no action. Coffee, n. The person upon whom one coughs. Flabbergasted, adj. Appalled by discovering how much weight one has gained. Abdicate, v. To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach. Negligent, adj. Absentmindedly answering the door when wearing only a …

The power of opinions for brands

http://brash3d.com/project/pequenas-voces/?lang=en Dennis Ryan, the Chief Creative Officer at Element 79, believes that “Brands are opinions”. Dr Philip Kotler, world-renowned marketing expert, says “Brands help people make decisions.” Increasingly my own view is a mix of both these wonderful ideas: Brands need to express, and be associated with opinions, that help people make decisions.

7 lessons from the Sevens

source link Mickey Mice, surgeons, musclemen, vampires, men in tutus … yes, it’s Rugby Sevens weekend in Wellington. And that means teams of people dressed thematically and wandering the streets of the CBD. Welcome to a brand of rugby where the games themselves are virtually the backdrop for the actions and celebrations going on in the crowd and beyond the stadium. But there are also some important lessons for the marketers amongst us. Here are my seven out-takes from the madness: Sometimes the event is strongest when it carries the name but isn’t actually the focus. In other words, it becomes the platform or prompt for a wider circle of participation. That wider circle may be where the money is. As per yesterday’s post – if you change the format, you also challenge the expectations of what must take place. In the case of Sevens, the change of game format has evolved into a social prompt for an audience-wide costume-party. If you give people genuine permission to behave differently, the initial hesitancy will give way to an …

The real power of endorsements (and other opinions)

The purser on the plane this morning reminded us as we landed that the airline had just won two industry awards. She didn’t name them but the point was made. Endorsement brings that extra degree of confirmation that we as consumers have made a good choice. It plays to our collective wish to make wise purchases. It tells us we got it right. The lack of specifics doesn’t matter. Schemas – the snapshot opinions that we form of people, places, things – are hugely powerful influencers. They help us navigate too many choices, too many questions, too much conflicting information, too little time. They motivate us to engage. Without realising it, we form schemas for almost everything. Some are positive. Some are negative. Some are unjustified, either way. But the most common one is actually blank. It says “I don’t know what to think”. People literally don’t have a clue. The reason is simple. You didn’t provide one. Your website looked the same as everyone else. The email you sent them was formulated and vanilla. …

That’s a wrap

Format is really just a polite word for expectation. The way something is meant to be packaged. Years ago, they told The Doors they’d have to recut “Light My Fire” to make it a single because it didn’t fit the format – too long. It was an OK single I guess, but it was nothing like the real thing. Change led to compromise. The original didn’t cram into a single for a reason. It would be like trying to make a 3 minute version of Bohemian Rhapsody. What are you going to leave out? But the reverse is also true – works that may have one or two good ideas, repeated and padded to try and make them look and feel more substantial, to make them extend into the format. Here’s the reasoning behind that action – if it’s a book, it must be 180 pages, so 180 pages it will be. Otherwise it’s not a book, it’s an extended essay or a long article or a something else. It must be that long in …

How do you value a crowd-based brand?

What is the value of global friendship and can you actually assign a price to it? Facebook’s own stats say that the site now has more than 500 million active users, and that 50% of them log on to Facebook in any given day. That means Goldman Sachs’ implied valuation of $50 billion suggests every active user is worth around about $100. Is that a lot? I actually don’t think it matters. The much more interesting question is: $100 – to whom? Users are not paying money to talk to their friends, post their photos and catch up on what’s going on as they generate content on Facebook, but if Goldman Sachs is right, then that’s what their millions of activities will generate for someone else. So who’s anticipating the $100 of value, and just as importantly, how? Investors, yes. But based on the production of what? There have been any number of comparisons between Facebook and Google – but to me, they overlook a fundamental difference. Google does produce something: a very powerful search …